Tarangire National Park

Tarangire National Park has some of the highest population density of elephants anywhere in Tanzania, and its sparse vegetation, strewn with baobab and acacia trees, makes it a beautiful and distinct location. Located just a few hours drive from the town of Arusha, Tarangire is a popular stop for safari goers travelling through the northern circuit on their way to Ngorongoro and the Serengeti. The park extends into two game controlled areas and the wildlife is allowed to move freely throughout.

 

Before the rains, droves of gazelles, wildebeests, zebras, and giraffes migrate to Tarangire National Park’s scrub plains where the last grazing land still remains. Tarangire offers unparalleled game viewing, and during the dry season elephants abound. Families of the pachyderms play around the ancient trunks of baobab trees and strip acacia bark from the thorn trees for their afternoon meal. Breathtaking views of the Maasai Steppe and the mountains to the south make a stop at Tarangire a memorable experience.

 

Day after day of cloudless skies. The fierce sun sucks the moisture from the landscape, baking the earth with a dusty red and the withered grass as brittle as straw. The Tarangire River has shriveled to a shadow of its wet season self. Nonetheless it is choked with wildlife. Thirsty nomads have wandered hundreds of parched kilometres knowing that here as always, there is water.

 

Herds of up to 300 elephants scratch the dry river bed for underground streams, while migratory wildebeest, zebra, buffalo, impala, gazelle, hartebeest and eland crowd the shrinking lagoons. It has the greatest concentration of wildlife outside the Serengeti ecosystem – a smorgasbord for predators – and the one place in Tanzania where dry-country antelope such as the stately fringe-eared oryx and peculiar long-necked gerenuk are regularly observed.

 

Tarangire National Park has many Giraffe  and it is the home of the recently discovered rare white giraffe. This albino giraffe was spotted by Dr Derek Lee, founder and scientist at the Wild Nature Institute during his research at the Park. This giraffe has been give the name Omo and the news have spread all over the world because no other place in the world such animal exist. It is expected that Omo will attract many tourists from all over the world to visit Tarangire National Park with the aim of seeing live this incredible creature.

 

 

During the rainy season, the seasonal visitors scatter over a 20,000 sq km (12,500 sq miles) range until they exhaust the green plains and the river calls once more. But Tarangire’s mobs of elephant are easily encountered, wet or dry.
The swamps, tinged green year round, are the focus for 550 bird varieties, the most breeding species in one habitat as compared to elsewhere in the world.

On drier ground you find the Kori bustard, the heaviest flying bird; the stocking-thighed ostrich, the world’s largest bird; and small parties of ground hornbills blustering like turkeys.

 

More ardent bird-lovers might keep an eye open for screeching flocks of the dazzlingly colourful yellow-collared lovebird, and the somewhat drabber rufous-tailed weaver and ashy starling – all endemic to the dry savannah of north-central Tanzania.

 

Disused termite mounds are often frequented by colonies of the endearing dwarf mongoose, and pairs of red-and-yellow barbet, which draw attention to themselves by their loud, clockwork-like duetting.

 

Tarangire’s pythons climb trees, as do its lions and leopards, lounging in the branches where the fruit of the sausage tree disguises the twitch of a tail.

 

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